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Free Practice Tests for Test Prep

Free Practice Tests

Taking practice tests is an important part of test prep, whether you prepping for AP exams or the ASVAB exam. Download our free practice tests below to start prepping for your tests!

Free AP Practice Tests

AP Calculus AB

AP English Language Composition

AP English Literature and Composition

AP U.S. Government and Politics

AP U.S. History

AP World History

AP Biology


Free SAT Subject Test Practice Tests

SAT Literature Subject Test

SAT U.S. History Subject Test

SAT Math Level 1 Subject Test

SAT Math Level 2 Subject Test


Free ASVAB Practice Tests

Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery Exam

 

Test-Prep Strategies

Learn Test-Prep Strategies from Dr. Gary Gruber to Get Your Best Test Scores

The link between standardized test scores, like the SAT or ACT, and college admission chances is very strong, so you’re going to want to get your best possible score. And to get your best possible score, you’re likely going to do some test prep and study for your tests. How you study for your tests will determine how much you increase your score.

Trying to memorize everything that every standardized test covers would take you forever and would be almost impossible. Rather than memorizing how to answer certain problems, you should use critical-thinking skills and strategies that help you see the best next step toward solving many kinds of problems. Critical, strategic thinking is a skill that will last you a lifetime.

mymaxscore-strategies-to-improve-your-score-video

The #1 Most Important Test-Prep Strategy from Dr. Gary Gruber

You can look at the solution to a problem and thus figure out how to solve that specific problem, or you can learn a powerful strategy that will enable you to answer hundreds of problems. The most effective way to prepare for the SAT or ACT is to learn strategies.

Ready to start learning more about test-prep strategies? Check out Gruber’s top 5 ACT strategies.

Gruber's Root Words

Information adapted from Gruber's SAT Word Master.

Learn these roots to help increase your test scores and improve your reading comprehension.

ROOTS

RootMeaningExamples
cap, capt, cept, ceive to take, to hold captive—one who is held
receive—to take
capable—to be able to take hold of things
concept—an idea or thought held in mind
cred to believe credible—believable
credit—belief, trust
curr, curs, cours to run current—now in progress, running
cursor—a moveable indicator
recourse—to run for aid
dic, dict to say indicate—to say by demonstrating
diction—verbal saying
duc, duct to lead

induce—to lead to action
aqueduct—a pipe or waterway that leads water somewhere

fac, fic, fect, fy to make, to do facile—easy to do
fiction—something that has been made up
satisfy—to make happy
affect—to make a change in
jec, ject to throw project—to put forward
trajectory—a path of an object that has been thrown
mit, mis to send admit—to send in
missile—something that gets sent through the air
pon, pos to place transpose—to place across
compose—to put into place many parts
deposit—to place in something
scrib, script to write describe—to write or tell about
scripture—a written tablet
spec, spic to look specimen—an example to look at
inspect—to look over
ten, tain to hold maintain—to hold up or keep
retentive—holding
ven, vent to come advent—a coming
convene—to come together

Types of Test Prep

pencils notebook

You can choose from several different types of test prep.

For example, you can:

There are pros and cons to each type of test prep, so you should try to figure out which format best suits your learning style and needs, as well as your budget.

Online Test Prep

Online software test prep can be a good option if you enjoy working at the computer. Most online test prep is great at showing you immediately what you're doing wrong and helping you focus on what you need to work on most. However, if you are easily distracted when working at a computer, this might not be the best option for you. And some online test prep programs are much better than others, so make sure you research a company and its software before you decide to buy it.

Build Your Own Test-Prep Program

Building your own test-prep program can be especially beneficial if you already know most of the test material and are aware of what you need to work on. Test-prep classes may spend too much of your valuable time on concepts you've already mastered. As with the online software prep, if you build your own test-prep program, you can focus your time on the types of questions you most need to practice. However, if you need structure or lack discipline, you may end up slacking off.

We offer great test-prep books from the leading experts to help you build your own test prep program and get your best score.

Test-Prep Classes

Test-prep classes provide the structure that some students need. However, test-prep classes are usually expensive and some students complain that the information provided in the class is the same information in a test-prep book. They also require you to spend time on every topic, which you may not need. If you're great in English, for example, you might have to sit through classes that won't help you. One of the best things about these classes is that they keep you working at test prep a little at a time over a six to eight week period, preventing the inclination to cram test prep into the three days before the test, which is much more likely to stress you out than to improve your score.

Private Test-Prep Tutor

Hiring a private tutor may benefit students who have trouble with a particular section of a test, students with learning disabilities, and students who are motivated but need more structure than they can get by building their own test-prep program. The best tutors will help you assess your knowledge and determine where to focus your effort, will assign you work to do on your own, and when you meet again will answer your questions or explain what confused you while you were working. However, tutors can get very expensive, and how much you get out of preparing with a tutor will depend somewhat on how hard your work between your tutoring sessions.

Study and Test-Day Tips

teentesting

Studying for the SAT, ACT, and other standardized tests can help boost your score and improve your chances of acceptance at colleges and universities you decide to apply to.

Our experts have great study and test-day tips to help take some of the stress out of prepareing for the SAT, ACT, and all the other standardized tests that you might take during high school.

Fiske's Study Tips

Fiske's Study Tips help you figure out how to start studying and preparing for your tests. Learn about the best ways to study so you have the best chance to improve your scores.

Test Anxiety Tips

Test anxiety can cause you to stress out before or even during the test. Learn about the common cause of test anxiety and how to avoid it.

Fiske's Test-Day Tips

Fiske's Test-Day Tips help you lower your stress the night before and day of your test. Not sure what you need to bring with you? Fiske has a list of things that are required or beneficial to bring on test day,

Myth about Standardized Tests

Information adapted from The 75 Biggest Myths about College Admissions.

 

Myth: Your performance on standardized tests is all-important.

Reality: It is true that SAT/ACT scores are still used by many schools in the admission decision process. However, there is a substantial debate within the academic community about the value of these scores, as they have not been shown to be reliable predictors of college success.

PSAT

Thinking about taking the PSAT? We can help you understand and prep for the test.

teen readingThe PSAT—or preliminary SAT— is usually taken in fall of your junior year and is great practice for the SAT. If you score high on the PSAT, you can compete for a National Merit Scholarship.  Because the PSAT tests the same things as the SAT and qualifies you for a scholarship, some students feel a lot of pressure and anxiety to get a high score.

But you don’t have to panic about the PSAT. We have all the PSAT resources, strategies, and tips to help you get your best score, without trying to learn everything before the test. Dr. Gary Gruber and your other test-prep mentors are ready to help you master the PSAT (and maybe even try for a National Merit Scholarship).

The #1 Most Important PSAT Tip from Dr. Gary Gruber

Learn some specific  PSAT strategies  
Many PSAT test-prep programs try to use quick-fixes or memorization. Memorization does not help you answer a variety of the questions you’ll see on the PSAT. Strategies help you “process” think, helping you avoid a fast, rushed, and wrong answer.

Rather than memorizing how to solve one problem, you should learn strategies that help you solve hundreds of PSAT problems.

PSAT Overview

Here’s a quick overview of the structure of the PSAT and the content covered. For more details on the PSAT, check out these Frequently Asked Questions about the PSAT.

Section

Time

Types of Questions

Critical Reading
(2 sections)

Two 25-minute sections

Sentence completion—13 questions
Reading passages—35 questions

Writing
(1 section)

One 30-minute section

Identifying sentence errors—14 questions
Improving sentences—20 questions
Improving paragraphs—5 questions

Math
(2 sections)

Two 25-minute sections

Regular math—28 multiple-choice questions
Grid-ins (student-produced responses)—10 grid-in questions

Total time: 2 hours and 10 minutes, no breaks

SAT Practice

Getting ready for the big test? We can help with your SAT practice.

sat practiceThe link between SAT scores and admission chances is strong—and would be good reason by itself to make students nervous about taking it. But the scariest part of the SAT is not the fact that it is important, but rather that, if you’ve never taken it before, the results are unpredictable.

But your SAT scores don’t have to be unpredictable. We have all the practice tests, strategies, and tips to help you get your best SAT score. Dr. Gary Gruber and your other College Countdown SAT Test-Prep Mentors are ready to help you beat the SAT.

The #1 Most Important SAT Tip from Dr. Gary Gruber

Don’t try to memorize everything. Learn some specific SAT strategies.
Using strategies will let you think mechanically without racking your brain. When answering questions on the SAT, don’t concentrate on or panic about finding the answer. Try to extract something in the question that is curious or will lead you to the next step in the question. By doing this, you will process the question, enabling you to reach an answer.

Instead of memorizing how to solve one problem or one type of problem, learning SAT strategies will help you understand how to answer hundreds of problems.

SAT Overview

Here’s a quick overview of the structure of the SAT and the basic content covered. For more details on the SAT, check out these Frequently Asked Questions about the SAT.

Section

Time

Types of Questions

Critical Reading
(3 sections)

Two 25-minute sections
One 25-minute section

Sentence completion—19 questions
Reading passages—48 questions

Math
(3 sections)

Two 25-minute sections
One 20-minute section

Regular math—44 questions
Grid-ins (student-produced responses)—10 minutes

Writing
(3 sections)

Two 25-minute sections
One 10-minute section

Student-produced essay (25 minutes)
Identifying sentence errors—18 questions
Improving sentences—25 questions
Improving paragraphs—6 questions

Unscored
(1 section)

One 25-minute section

Experimental questions can be from any section—number varies

Total time: 3 hours and 45 minutes, plus two 5-minute breaks and one 1-minute break.

Ready to get started? Check out my top 5 SAT strategies.

Test Prep

We can help you with your test prep for the PSAT, ACT, SAT, and more!

test prepStandardized tests are an important part of the college admissions process. Your scores can have a direct impact on which colleges you get accepted to and even how much scholarship money you receive. In fact, a recent College Board survey showed test scores ranked as the third most important factor in college admissions, ahead of application essays and class rank.1

It’s normal for the pressure to make you a little nervous. But you don’t have to stress about your tests. We have all the test-prep resources—practice tests, strategies, and tips—to help you get your best scores on all of your tests. Dr. Gary Gruber and your other College Countdown test-prep mentors are ready to help you.

The #1 Most Important Test-Prep Tip from Dr. Gary Gruber

Don’t try to study everything that’s covered on every test.

A lot of students stress out about what to study for standardized tests and then get overwhelmed when they try to study everything. There’s just not enough time to study everything that’s covered on every test.

Instead, you need to figure out where you need help and focus on learning test-prep strategies for the areas that will improve your score the most.

Ready to get started? Check out the articles below to jump start your test prep.

Source:

1. “The SAT Report on College & Career Readiness: 2012.” The College Board. September 2012.

ACT Practice

Getting ready for the big test? We can help with your ACT practice.

act practiceThe ACT is an important part of the college admissions process across the country. Today, more American high school students take the ACT than the SAT, and their scores can have a direct impact on which colleges they get accepted to. That pressure can make students pretty nervous about taking the ACT.  A lot of students stress out because they don’t know what to study for the ACT and become overwhelmed trying to learn everything before the test.

But you don’t have to stress about the ACT. We have all the practice tests, strategies, and tips to help you get your best ACT score, without having to review everything on the test. Dr. Gary Gruber and your other College Countdown ACT test-prep mentors are ready to help you beat the ACT.

The #1 Most Important ACT Tip from Dr. Gary Gruber

Learn some specific ACT strategies  
Learning ACT strategies will let you think mechanically without racking your brain. When answering questions, don’t panic about finding the right answer. My ACT strategies help you extract something in the question that will lead you to the next step in solving the problem.

Instead of learning how to solve one problem at a time or trying to use memorization, if you learn ACT strategies, you will be able to solve hundreds of problems.

ACT Overview

Here’s a quick overview of the structure of the ACT and the basic content covered. For more details on the ACT, check out these Frequently Asked Questions about the ACT.

Section

Time

Type of Questions

Math

60 questions
60 minutes

Elementary/Pre-Algebra—24 questions
Intermediate Algebra/Coordinate Geometry—18 questions
Plane Geometry/Trigonometry—18 questions

Reading

40 questions (4 passages)
35 minutes

Prose fiction passage—10 questions
Humanities passage—10 questions
Social studies passage—10 questions
Natural science passage—10 questions

English

75 questions (5 passages)
45 minutes

Usage/Mechanics—40 questions
Rhetorical skills—35 questions

Science

40 questions (7 data sets)
35 minutes

Interpretation, analysis, evaluation, reasoning, and problem-solving skills required for natural sciences

Writing (optional)

1 prompt
30 minutes

Presentation of a point of view in a student-produced essay

Total time:
ACT only: 2 hours 55 minutes, plus one 10-minute break
ACT plus writing: 3 hours 25 minutes, plus one 10- and one 5-minute break

Ready to get started? Check out my top 5 act strategies to start improving your ACT score.

 

SAT Subject Tests

SAT Subject Tests, sometimes called SAT IIs, are one-hour long standardized tests in 20 different subjects. Certain colleges might require or recommend SAT Subject Tests. Some colleges use SAT Subject Tests to place students in courses that are the most appropriate for them. Students who do well on the SAT Subject Tests may place out of introductory level classes.

You should ask colleges that you’re applying to if they take SAT Subject Test scores into consideration when placing students in classes. If they do, you may want to consider taking them during your senior year, if you haven’t taken any previously.

SAT Subject Tests Offered by the College Board

Literature German
U.S. History German with Listening
World History Spanish
Math Level 1 Spanish with Listening
Math Level 2 Modern Hebrew
Biology/EM Italian
Chemistry Latin
Physics Chinese with Listening
French Japanese with Listening
French with Listening Korean with Listening

Please see the College Board website for specific information about each SAT Subject Test.

When should I take SAT Subject Tests?

You can take SAT Subject Tests anytime during your high school career. Students often take a specific test after taking a high school class that covers the information tested.

For instance, if you are taking a Chemistry class and decide that you want to take the Chemistry Subject Test, you should probably wait until after you have finished the class. You should take the SAT Subject Test while the information is still fresh in your mind, but you should also make sure that you have enough time available to study.

As with the SAT and ACT, you should get familiar with the structure of each test before you take it. See all of our SAT Subject Test books in our bookstore.